Art

Art at Studley High School

Staff

Mrs B Milne B Ed (Hons)
Head of Art & Design

Miss K Hughes
Teacher of Art & Design

PROGRAMME OF STUDY KEY STAGE 3

Throughout the first three years pupils experience a broad course, one which builds on the pupils’ existing knowledge and experience and introduces them to new ideas, processes and media.

As experience grows tasks become more challenging, as does the depth of investigation.

Pupils study artists’ work from a variety of periods, styles and cultures and they are encouraged to make connections with their own work.

During the three year course pupils will experience both two and three-dimensional work in a range of materials including clay, wire, paper and card, textiles including weaving, setting and dyeing, print making, photography and ICT based activities. They will work from direct observation, personal experience and imagination as they develop art on a variety of scales, including groupwork.

Whatever their ability, pupils are encouraged to be experimental, innovative and to take risks with ideas and effects.

DRAWING

Drawing has a key role in the Art experience. It is used both as a means of expression – of ideas, thoughts and feelings, and as a means of exploration and analysis. In Key Stage 3 drawing is taught as a discrete skill and as an integral element of the creative process.

Pupils are encouraged to:

  • draw to see, draw to understand, draw to think, draw to imagine
  • use a wide range of drawing media from the more traditional pencil, pen, charcoal etc to the less obvious – drawing with string, drawing with wire, drawing with thread etc
  • look at the drawings of other artists and make connections with their own work
  • practice regularly through class and homework activities

Above all pupils are encouraged to draw with increasing confidence and experience life-long enjoyment of drawing.

WORKBOOKS

All pupils in Year 7, 8 & 9 keep an Art Workbook. They are encouraged to see their workbook as a tool – a way of collecting, recording and displaying. The workbook is used regularly during lesson times and for completing homework tasks.

Uses might include:

  • drawing from observation
  • practising a skill or technique
  • experimenting with media
  • researching a topic and presenting information
  • note-making – information, annotation, thoughts, opinions, analysis
  • storing images including photographs

The workbook should reflect a process of development as an artist, and staff encourage pupils to feel a sense of ownership of their workbook. Most tasks will be directed by the teacher but pupils may also use the workbook to develop work of their own. Each year pupils are given a list of suggested topics or starting points for them to explore in their own time if they so wish.

PROGRAMME OF STUDY

YEAR 7

UNIVERSAL THEMES – FLORA AND FAUNA, ABORIGINAL ART, SELF PORTRAIT

FLORA AND FAUNA

Pupils explore the shapes, structures and textures of natural forms such as shells, plants, flowers, cells, birds, butterflies and insects. They work in a variety of media including pencil, paint, paper collage and ink. Drawings are developed into print, metal and textiles.

Pupils make connections with a number of works of art including Impressionist paintings, Henri Rousseau’s jungle paintings and Victorian tile patterns.

ABORIGINAL ART

Pupils explore Aboriginal art, gaining an insight into the traditions and cultural context. Focus is on colour and pattern and the use of symbolic marks and images. Pupils explore groupwork when developing large-scale relief panels and print making.

SELF PORTRAIT

Pupils study the work of portrait painters such as Pablo Picasso, Ford Maddox Brown (The Last of England), Jan van Eyck (The Arnolfini marriage) and Joseph Cornell’s symbolic boxes and collages. Pupils explore the concept of SELF, and how this can be expressed through art. They learn how to draw the human face and use family photos to consider inherited traits and individuality. Pupils use memorabilia, language, photos and other ideas they consider to be personally significant to create a self-addressed parcel. Self-portrait drawings are developed into abstract paintings.

YEAR 8

UNIVERSAL THEMES – FOOD AND DRINK (POP ART), EVENT / JOURNEY, ABSTRACT ART AND CUBISM

FOOD AND DRINK

Pupils study Pop Art and explore prints of familiar images, large-scale panels and three-dimensional structures of the period. Using the theme of food and drink they make a series of studies using oil and chalk pastel, paint on canvas and collage. Pupils make prints and develop 3D paper sculptures. Focus is on the appeal and familiarity of food items such as fast food, sweets, cakes and chocolate, whilst developing their awareness of the health issues associated with such products.

EVENT / JOURNEY

Pupils study a range of paintings and artefacts which depict an event or journey. They look at the Bayeaux Tapestry, Egyptian art and work by Marc Chagall and Picasso. Pupils develop ideas based on events and journeys they have experienced using a variety of painting and drawing techniques.

ABSTRACT ART AND CUBISM

Pupils create a series of small observation studies of musical instruments. They learn the principles of abstraction and develop collages and relief panels in card. This project is linked to the abstract works by Georges Braque and Juan Gris.

YEAR 9

UNIVERSAL THEMES – SURREAL ART, FANTASTIC AND STRANGE, ISSUE BASED ART

SURREAL ART

Pupils explore the surreal work of painters such as Dali, Magritte and Paul Critchley. They see how assumptions can be made and challenged and illusions created through changes in place, scale and juxtaposition. Pupils work with photomontage to create 3D surreal roomscapes. They are encouraged to use photography as a means of seeing everyday objects in an unusual way. The idea of movement in art is explored. Pupils study Jacob Epstein’s Rock Drill and make observational studies of machine parts before developing their own mechanical structures.

FANTASTIC AND STRANGE

Project work focuses on Cathedral architecture and pupils begin by looking at gargoyles. They learn how their appearance relates to the guttering systems and Medieval fears of the unknown.

Pupils make tonal studies and develop their drawings into clay sculptures.

The structures of cathedrals are explored through ink and wax resist and text and images are combined to express the powerful atmosphere and respect for these places of worship.

ISSUE BASED ART

Pupils research an issue which affects themselves and / or the local and wider community. They learn how to present information and how to develop a piece of art which makes a thought provoking statement. Pupils might create T shirt designs or posters and they make connections with the work of Chila Kumari Burman and Henry Moore.

PROGRAMME OF STUDY KEY STAGE 4

ENDORSED ART

FINE ART DRAWING AND PAINTING

This course involves the use of a wide range of drawing and painting materials and techniques (inks, watercolours, pastels, oils, collage etc). Students are able to use the computer for research purposes, and as a design tool often in conjunction with digital imagery. The project-based approach allows freedom for individual ideas and expression, and an imaginative use of materials is encouraged. Uses and applications include illustration and graphics, print making, mural painting and other forms of 2D imagery. This is a practical course but the use of notes to record ideas and opinions is encouraged.